Values

10 Principles for a Sustainable Society

1. DEMOCRACY
People must be able to participate in the political, economic and environmental decisions that affect them.

2. SELF-DETERMINATION, LOCAL CONTROL, SELF-RELIANCE
The people most affected by a situation must have the authority to solve it; distant administrations cannot respond adequately.

We support a restructuring of social, political and economic institutions to a democratic, less bureaucratic system where power is returned to local communities.

With respect to trade agreements and institutions, we would seek to implement a system of fair trade where regional production is consumed by the region first and the balance would be traded outside the region for goods and services that are not provided locally.

3. ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY
Human beings are a part of nature; they are not separate from it. Whatever we do to the web of life, we do to ourselves. The evolutionary creativity and continued productivity of Earth and its regional ecosystems require the continuance of their key structures and ecological processes. Pollution of air, sediments and water, along with exploitive extraction of inorganic and organic constituents, weaken ecosystem integrity.

4. COMMON NATURAL HERITAGE
Global sustainability and justice can only be achieved when responsibility is shared at all levels of society. We are all called to take responsibility for ourselves, our families, and our communities.

Common resources such as water, air, forests and other natural resources should be shared equitably. Communities create a collective culture and knowledge and we support everyone’s right and access to the more contemporary ‘common’ resources that we’ve come to expect, e.g., education and adequate health care.

5. DIVERSITY
We honour the diversity of life on our planet. An eco-centric worldview values Earth’s diversity in all its forms, the non-human, as well as the human. Cultural, biological, social and economic diversity are central to healthy, functioning communities.

6. HUMAN RIGHTS
Governments should safeguard civil and political rights, but also has a responsibility to protect economic, social, and cultural rights.

7. JOBS, LIVELIHOODS & EMPLOYMENT
Rather than people being subservient to the economy, the economy should provide for human needs within the natural limits of the earth.

8. FOOD SECURITY AND SAFETY
Related to subsidiarity (see number 2), our economic model should include a guaranteed local food supply of safe and healthful food.

9. EQUITY (EQUALITY & SOCIAL JUSTICE)
Manitoba Greens seek to promote a culture of tolerance, nonviolence and peace. We encourage and support mutual understanding, solidarity and cooperation among all peoples and within and among nations.

Equality and fairness need to replace domination and control. Full and equal participation by all Manitobans is needed in the decision making processes of society. Individual, families and communities have access to the resources of the society.

All have the right to a natural and social environment supportive of human dignity, bodily health and spiritual well-being.

10. THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE
Look before you leap — economic regulatory activity should consider this adage when reviewing a practice or product which potentially poses a significant threat of harm to human health or the environment.

Our principles are based on the principles described by the International Forum on Globalization.